How to Make Mushroom Stock from Kitchen Scraps

How to Make Mushroom Stock from Kitchen Scraps
You know what they say about assuming, right?

Yeah.

So sometimes I assume that if I can find an ingredient at the grocery store here, everyone else can easily find that ingredient too. But it’s not always true! And I’ve had a few people ask me about mushroom stock. I always buy cartons of it and I figured that they sold them everywhere. Well, I guess not.

Oops.

Since I did a post on how to make your own vegetable broth from kitchen scraps last month, I thought I’d do a post about how to make mushroom stock this month. So now all your broth and stock needs are covered! Mushroom stock is a great staple to keep on hand if you don’t eat meat–the deep, rich flavor and color makes it a great substitute for beef stock.

Like vegetable broth, most mushroom stock recipes call for lots of fresh mushrooms and vegetables. Some of them even use dried mushrooms too. And I am way way way too cheap to buy expensive dried mushrooms just to make stock. Even the fresh mushrooms add up in cost if you’re using more than just the white variety. So I set out to come up with a mushroom stock recipe that, like vegetable broth, used kitchen scraps. Cheap! No waste!

Frozen Mushroom & Veggie Scraps
So if you have your freezer bag started for vegetable broth, you’ll want to start another freezer bag for scraps to use to make mushroom stock. And now, whenever you make something with mushrooms, instead of trimming the stems, pop them off and put them in the freezer bag. The more kinds of mushroom stems you have, the better–I used white, cremini, portabella, and shiitake mushrooms in this batch of stock. (Bonus: Pulling off the stems instead of cutting the ends off will help you save on prep time too.) Leek trimmings, skins and trimmings from onions and shallots, carrot peels and trimmings, and leaves and ends of celery can be added to the bag too. But make sure your bag consists of about half mushrooms. (This is mushroom stock, after all!) Oh, and everything you put in the bag should be clean–nothing dirty, nothing rotten, nothing moldy.

When you’re ready to make your stock, combine the frozen scraps with double the amount of water in a large Dutch oven or stockpot. So if you have 4 cups of scraps, add 8 cups of water. You can also add a minced clove of garlic or two, a bay leaf, springs of parsley, thyme, or sage, and even some fresh veggies if you like. A splash of red wine is a nice addition too. If you want to make the stock into mushroom broth, just season it to taste with some salt and pepper when it’s done cooking. Easy!

How to Make Mushroom Stock from Kitchen Scraps
Bring the mushroom stock to a boil and then let it simmer partially covered on low heat for 45 minutes. After 45 minutes, uncover the pot and let it simmer for 30 minutes more. Let the stock cool and then pour it into a bowl through a fine mesh strainer. Use a wooden spoons to press the vegetables against the strainer in order to extract as much stock as possible. You can use the stock immediately, keep it in the fridge for about a week, or freeze it for a few months.

Frozen Mushroom Stock
I like freezing mine flat in freezer bags. (Need some freezer labels so you remember what you have frozen and when it needs to be used by? Oh, I have some!) You can stack them in your freezer and they’ll take up a minimal amount of space. When you’re ready to use the stock, let it thaw in the fridge for about a day.

Kitchen Scrap Mushroom Stock

Cook Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Serving Size: about 6 cups of broth

Kitchen Scrap Mushroom Stock

I hate wasting perfectly good vegetables to make mushroom stock--using kitchen scraps is a cheaper, less wasteful alternative!

Ingredients

  • 2 c. frozen mushroom stems
  • 2 c. frozen vegetable scraps (onion and shallot skins, carrot and celery trimmings, etc.)
  • 3 sprigs parsley
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 8 c. water

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients in large Dutch oven or stock pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low. Simmer partially covered for 45 minutes; remove lid and simmer uncovered for 30 minutes more. Allow stock to cool, then pour through a fine mesh strainer into a bowl. Press vegetable scraps against the strainer with a wooden spoon in order to extract as much stock as possible. Discard solids and store stock in a plastic container or freezer bag.

Notes

If you want to make broth rather than stock, simply season the stock with salt and pepper to taste after it's done cooking.

Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by ZipList Recipe Plugin
http://ohmyveggies.com/how-to-make-mushroom-stock-from-kitchen-scraps/

Kiersten Frase

About Kiersten

Kiersten is the founder and head writer of Oh My Veggies. She lives just outside of Raleigh with her husband and their 4 wonky-eyed rescue cats.   Read more from Kiersten →

Oh My Veggiemail!

Sign up to get the latest updates from Oh My Veggies delivered to your inbox!

Comments

  1. says

    I threw a bunch of vegetables scraps in my pot when I made chicken stock the other day, but I never thought of freezing them. What a great idea!!! I’ll have to remember that because most of my scraps end up in the compost and would be better served in a veggie stock. Great post!

    • Kiersten Frase says

      Yeah, now I just compost anything that won’t work in stock or broth. :) My compost hasn’t been doing much lately anyway–I guess it must be the cold weather, but it just sits and sits and doesn’t decompose!

  2. says

    First of all, fantastic recipe. I have a hard time finding mushroom stock where I live, but I really love the stuff for vegetarian/vegan recipes. I love the color of yours, I just want to dive into a pool of it and splash around a little.
    Also, I just found your site today, and I really love you.. it.. am I coming on too strong? What I am trying to say is I’m a fan!! Gorgeous photos and yummy looking recipes!!

    • Kiersten Frase says

      I live in a small-ish town, so I always work on the assumption that if I can find something here, everyone can find it where they live. Apparently I need to rethink this. :) And thank you for the kind words! :D

  3. Crista says

    Great recipe! One of the best soups I’ve ever eaten was made with a mushroom stock that the chef made with dried mushrooms… he said that was the ” secret” part of his recipe! haha

    • Kiersten Frase says

      Whenever I have to use dried mushrooms, I save the soaking liquid to use for stock! I wouldn’t want to buy dried mushrooms just to make stock, but if I’m using them anyway for something else, that liquid is really good.

    • Kiersten Frase says

      You are! Someone once did that to me–they told me a casserole was vegetarian, but it had bacon in it (I think because they didn’t have any vegetarian options for me to eat, so they panicked and said the casserole was meatless). I didn’t eat anymore as soon as I found out, but I got SO sick afterwards because I guess my body isn’t used to eating meat…

  4. Mindy says

    Fortunately, we have several farmer’s markets where I live and one or two have fresh mushrooms from the farm. They are fairly reasonably priced but I certainly have missed using this in this frugal way. Not anymore! Thank you.

    Mindy in Missouri

  5. Terry says

    I just made a quick stock to sub for beef broth, and as I didn’t simmer it for very long (nuked it for ~20 minutes in the microwave) I’m wondering if I could save the stems and use them again – ? How can I tell if the stems are “used up”?

If this is your first time commenting on Oh My Veggies, please take a minute to read our comment policy.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>