How To Roast Fall Vegetables (a semi-comprehensive guide)

By Kiersten | Last Updated: January 2, 2014

How To Roast Fall Veggies

How To Roast Fall Veggies
I don’t think a week goes by in our house that we don’t have roasted vegetables as a side dish. I love the way roasting brings out the flavor of vegetables and even though it might take a little bit longer than steaming or sautéing, it doesn’t require any additional work (in fact, it often requires less). And, in my expert vegetable roasting opinion, fall vegetables are the best vegetables to roast because they hold up so well in the oven.

What follows is a list of some of my favorite fall vegetables for roasting, complete with oven time (note that this varies depending on the size of the vegetables you’re using!) and temperatures. Although all you really need for most of these is a little bit of salt, pepper, and olive oil, I’ve also added some other suggestions. Add these after you’re done roasting the vegetables (if you’re using garlic, add it about 10 minutes before cooking time is done). And then enjoy!

Asparagus

Start by: Trimming ends and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper.
Cook at: 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes.
Try adding: Orange or lemon zest, Parmesan cheese, truffle oil, browned butter.

Beets

Start by: Scrubbing beets (don’t peel or trim!).
Cook at: 400 degrees for 45 minutes (depending on size).
Try adding: Orange zest, rosemary, butter, balsamic vinegar.

Broccoli

Start by: Cutting into florets and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper.
Cook at: 425 degrees for 10-15 minutes.
Try adding: Lemon juice, orange zest, garlic, red pepper flakes, Parmesan cheese, browned butter.

Brussels Sprouts

Start by: Trimming ends and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper.
Cook at: 400 degrees for 35-40 minutes.
Try adding: Lemon juice, Parmesan cheese, browned butter, fresh thyme, maple syrup.

Carrots

Start by: Peeling the carrots and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper.
Cook at: 400 degrees for 20-25 minutes.
Try adding: Fresh thyme, maple syrup, browned butter, rosemary.

Cauliflower

Start by: Cutting into florets and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper.
Cook at: 400 degrees for 30-40 minutes.
Try adding: Quartered kalamata olives, lemon juice, garlic, Parmesan cheese, panko.

Onions

Start by: Cutting into wedges and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper.
Cook at: 400 degrees for 50-60 minutes.
Try adding: Balsamic vinegar, rosemary, thyme.

Potatoes

Start by: Cutting into chunks and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper.
Cook at: 425 degrees for 30-40 minutes.
Try adding: Fresh herbs, garlic, roasted onions, pesto, lemon juice–anything!

Sweet Potatoes

Start by: Cutting into chunks and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper.
Cook at: 450 degrees for 35-40 minutes.
Try adding: Rosemary, thyme, maple syrup, cinnamon, soy sauce, dried cranberries.

Winter Squash

Start by: Cutting in half (see above) or into chunks and tossing with olive oil, salt, and pepper.
Cook at: 400 degrees for 45-50 minutes.
Try adding: Maple syrup, cayenne pepper, rosemary, cinnamon, dried cranberries.

About Kiersten

Kiersten is the founder and editor of Oh My Veggies.

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Comments

Those look incredibly tasty. That’s not something I’ve ever tried, but it totally appeals to my tastes so I need to!

Before I forget, is there a character limit on your name blank for commenting? I always have to abbreviate. Not a big deal, just wondered.

Hmm. Well, I looked, and there’s not anything in my dashboard (that I can find?) that lets me set the limit for the name. I guess I’d have to look at the code and do it manually? Do you know?

Thanks for the head’s up!

Ha! I’m not a big beet fan, but my husband is. I tried growing the Golden Detroit beets this fall and I was all ready to roast them (and take pretty pictures of them and post a recipe–I had it all planned!), but they never formed beets on the roots. Bummer.

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