7 Substitutes for Honey

substitutes for honey

When opting to avoid honey, some may have trouble finding substitutes for honey that are suitable. We’ve consulted the experts to find what they recommend instead, and which substitutes for honey will be best to use in your recipes.

DATE PASTE

According to Vegetarian Times, date paste is easily made at home as well as purchased here. To make your own, they suggest soaking pitted Medjool dates in fruit juice or water for at least an hour and then pulverizing in a food processor. Add liquid to your liking.

COCONUT NECTAR

With a unique and neutrally sweet flavor, coconut nectar is another delicious honey replacement which can be more versatile than you might imagine. Taken from coconut tree sap, coconut nectar contains vitamins B and C, several minerals and up to 17 amino acids. With its lower glycemic index, it can help you feel full longer than other types of sweeteners and it may help you lose weight. It’s a heart healthy alternative, great for those concerned with their cholesterol levels and safer for diabetics.

AGAVE NECTAR

Extracted from the core of the agave plant, called the pina, agave nectar is made is from heated and filtered sap. Makers create both light and dark nectars, the lighter requiring less heat and greater filtration while the darker requires the opposite of both processes. Agave nectar can be purchased at most grocery or natural health food stores or online.

MOLASSES

Also called black treacle, molasses is made in numerous varieties and said to be beneficial for several health-related issues. Created as a byproduct during the process of making sugar out of sugar beets and cane, molasses is thick, rich in vitamins and minerals, and the blackstrap variety is known as a great source of iron in particular.

BARLEY MALT SYRUP

Barley malt syrup is a versatile sweetener often used in baked goods, poured over pancakes or used in home brewing. Extracted from sprouted barley, it’s considered about “half as sweet” as refined table sugar, has a thick consistency and distinct malt flavor (think of a malted milkshake). Although high in some beneficial nutrients, it should be used in moderation due to it’s high maltose content.

BROWN RICE SYRUP

A vegan and gluten-free liquid, brown rice syrup can be used in place of sugar or honey in several ways. With a flavor less sweet than sugar, you can generally substitute in recipes by using 1 1/4 cup rice syrup for 1 cup sugar. Vegans use it on pancakes like regular syrup or in sweet tea or other beverages. It’s also known as ‘rice syrup’ or ‘rice malt’.

MAPLE SYRUP

An American pancake and waffle necessity, maple syrup is a staple in most kitchen pantries. However, you may want to check the label and ensure you’re giving your family actual maple syrup and not a chemically-flavored high fructose corn syrup cocktail. Made primarily in Canada and the state of Vermont, pure maple syrup is categorized Grade A and Grade B in the United States. Grade A is the ideal for eating while B is best for baking and cooking. Grade A is also placed into further categories of Light Amber, Medium Amber and Dark Amber as well. In addition, Vermont syrup inspectors have their own strict grading system for which false advertising fines can be imposed. Check this guide out for your best maple syrup options.

About Kristen

Kristen writes for several websites providing content related to education, the environment, vegetarianism, sociology, culture, psychology and more. You can reach her at: http://lakesedge.wix.com/lakesidewriting   Read more from Kristen →

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